Fresh off the Easel


It’s finally done…I think. I’m not quite sure I’m satisfied, but I don’t really know where else to go with this one. I’ve done so much to it already, that I should have planned in the beginning for. If anyone’s wondering if it’s really worth while to do those thumbnail sketches…IT IS!! I only did one, that I was pretty happy with, but, it didn’t work when translated to this big canvas. It used to have three mid-ground figures, and a background guy on a horse, and a guy leaning against a horse in the far background. I decided it was too busy, and after many attempts at just trying to FIX everything to make it look like it was supposed to be there, I systematically began eliminating things, until there was nothing left to eliminate. This would all have been much easier to do before the painting was near completion…with the thumbnails…but once again, my initial enthusiasm for the subject overtook my logic, and I dove right in without proper planning. NEVER AGAIN! This one was so hard.
I want to put this one out for critique. I desperately need input from other artists, so if anyone thinks this painting needs some help, or could use something else, please drop me a line. I would appreciate it so much. Like I said, I’m not really sure if it’s done or not, so let me know what you think. It also needs a title. “Fresh off the Easel” just isn’t going to cut it.
I really want to thank Eduardo Amorim, the amazing photographer whose photo was the inspiration for this shot. Check out his work at Flickr by clicking on his name.

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3 thoughts on “Fresh off the Easel

  1. Hello! I saw that you really wanted critique on this one, and I guess I’m hoping I can help a little bit.First off, I think you did a gorgeous background, and did an excellent job modeling the horse itself- there’s a lot of tension there you communicated really well, and the feeling of strong sunlight is really successful too- I particularly love the arcing shadows from the horse’s and the rider’s legs.If I were you, I’d revisit the bottom hooves, the dust around them, and the tail. The tail is just like the picture, it just feels odd to me at it’s current length- probably just a quirk of mine. The hooves can be seen more clearly in the reference photograph, and I think that helps the horse to appear a lot more grounded in the original image- the horse’s shadow goes out a little longer in that one too.The only other thing I see, and it might be completely what you intended- I think your horse is standing up straighter, that maybe it has entered into the oh-crap-I’m-going-over-backwards angle.Hehe- I just went back to have another look. I really do admire your painting- what jumped out at me this time was how perfect it all is with the horse’s head and bridle. Maybe looking at it as a whole, compared to an artist you admire, one who does similar subjects, would help you figure out what you think needs to be different?

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  2. I just found your blog via Maggie Stiefvater’s – I love your paintings especially the seascapes/children in seascapes – and your portraits are lovely. You do have a style! I don’t feel qualified to critique your horse painting, but for what it’s worth – I think the drama and movement of it might be intensified by making the tail and mane fly out a bit more? The two back hooves so close together do make it look dangerously close to toppling over, but then it’s a dangerous situation! Title… Breaking In…?

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